Check out the Giant Malaysian Katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis)! This is one of the largest insects in the world, with their bodies growing to 15 cm (6 inches) long with a 25 cm (10 inch) long wingspan. Though the last thing you want to hear is that this giant insect is carnivorous, they pose absolutely no threat to humans (aside from haunting your dreams, of course). Relatively speaking, the males of this species have the largest testes of any known animal at 14% of their body weight. If humans had the same ratio, a 91 kg (200 lb) man would have testes that weighed nearly 13 kgs (28 lbs)!Photo credit: Houston Museum of Natural Science
taken from I fucking love Science

Check out the Giant Malaysian Katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis)! This is one of the largest insects in the world, with their bodies growing to 15 cm (6 inches) long with a 25 cm (10 inch) long wingspan. Though the last thing you want to hear is that this giant insect is carnivorous, they pose absolutely no threat to humans (aside from haunting your dreams, of course). 

Relatively speaking, the males of this species have the largest testes of any known animal at 14% of their body weight. If humans had the same ratio, a 91 kg (200 lb) man would have testes that weighed nearly 13 kgs (28 lbs)!

Photo credit: Houston Museum of Natural Science

taken from I fucking love Science

(Source: planet8)

phoco:

NASA | SDO Observes Strong X-class Solar Flare

"Long-lived sunspot AR1967 returned to the Earthside of the sun on Feb. 25th and promptly erupted, producing an X4.9-class solar flare. This is the strongest flare of the year so far and one of the strongest of the current solar cycle. A movie from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows the explosion hurling a loop of hot plasma away from the blast site."

idkbreastcancer:

My Body as Canvas: Exploring my experience with chemotherapy through makeup. 

Today I chose to do a deer skull because I’ve been thinking about growth and decay, the way one feeds into another and the bittersweet beauty found in sickness and death. The forest and field in the pictures are located behind my house. These are the places where I walk my dogs, have conversations with my mother and clear my head. I think if you were to walk through a particular cavern in my heart you’d find yourself in this place, this contained and perpetually disappearing farmland and wilderness.

I embrace this part of my life as I embrace the month of November: even as the cold begins to creep into our bones and the leaves fall from the branches, it pushes us closer, toward warmth and togetherness. When we begin to understand mortality, we begin to experience life more richly and in ways we hadn’t previously considered. I consider myself an aesthete. Beauty is the light through which life is illuminated to me. I will continue to create, to find beauty in this particular part of my life, because to ignore it would be to waste an experience, sad as it may be, that has taught me new ways to navigate my existence.

Photo Credit: Patrick Barnes

Reading a scientific paper is a completely different process than reading an article about science in a blog or newspaper. Not only do you read the sections in a different order than they’re presented, but you also have to take notes, read it multiple times, and probably go look up other papers for some of the details. Reading a single paper may take you a very long time at first. Be patient with yourself. The process will go much faster as you gain experience.

libutron:

The Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

Urbanus proteus (Hesperiidae - Pyrginae) is a very particular butterfly by the white spots are distinguished at their upper wings are actually translucent sections. If you are lucky enough to see it perched on a flower, you can distinguish the colorful flowers through these “windows” on their wings. 

Their size ranges from 37 to 55 mm. It is a butterfly medium size easily recognizable by expansions in the form of its hind wings tail. The back of his body takes on a blue-green iridescent tone due to the dense and bright hairs that extend to the base of their wings. How others of its kind, has big eyes and antennae with a slight hook [1].

This butterfly can be found from Argentina north through Central America, the West Indies, and Mexico to peninsular Florida and South Texas. Occasionally strays and colonizes north to Connecticut, southern Illinois, eastern Kansas, southern Arizona, and southern California [2].

Caterpillars feed on leaves and live in shelters of rolled leaves.

Top photo shows an adult specimen from Sierra del Rosario, Cuba (©David Edwards). The photo below shows a caterpillar from Immokalee, Florida, US (©Steve Collins).